The Good, The Bad, and The Scary – Day 16

 

THE GOOD:

Vampires

 

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The Reformed Vampire Support Group

Catherine Jinks

 

Eternal youth sounds like a gift. Fifteen forever sounds like a curse. This gift/curse has been Nina Harrison’s way of life since 1973. After 30 plus years of being 15, Nina still lives with her mother and has the pleasure of belonging to a support group for vampire misfits. These vampires try not to attack or otherwise hurt any unsuspecting humans, and stick to that goal until Casimir, one of their group members, is found murdered. Nina along with Dave, another group member, ditch their normal lives and go on the hunt to find out who killed Casimir. But can these unlikely heroes find and stop this slayer before every member of the group is put in danger?

 

The tone of Reformed Vampire Support Group is comedy not horror. The perpetually young Nina  is a vampire that doesn’t want to be a vampire but supports herself by writing vampire novels. That premise alone is absurd in all the right ways. Throw in the fact that muder victim/group member Casimir is also the vampire that brought vampirism to Australia and the person that fanged Nina, and you have a complex and rich backstory. Along with creating depth into her story, Jinks’ talent lies in building a world around these vampire characters. Her supernatural elements are brought to an everyday setting.  Vampires have remarkably human lives that don’t involve living in mausoleums or embracing a gothic “children of the night” style. They are just people trying to make it in the world who have the added problem of keeping there bloodlust in check. What could be more normal than that?

 

There’s an abiding myth that vampires are afraid of garlic. This, of course, is a lie. The garlic myth was triggered hundreds of years ago, when a nameless vampire joked about not attacking some woman because she smelled of garlic. I mean, how could anyone be terrified of a culinary herb? 

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